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Information and Communication Technologies

Benin: A competition to transform the country’s tourist sites into a laboratory for innovation

Claude Borna's picture
Also available in: Français



Benin possesses an enormous natural, historical, and cultural heritage. However, its potential has barely been explored. A study by the National Agency for the Promotion of Heritage and the Development of Tourism (ANPT) found that only 2 to 5 percent of Benin’s tourist potential has thus far been tapped.

Faced with the new human, environmental, and technological challenges of the twenty-first century, how can we think of and devise solutions that will rewrite the rules in the sector, which is undergoing rapid expansion in Africa?

24 hours in Hargeisa, Somaliland



Somaliland is often described as a breakaway state, void of international recognition. But most parts of Somaliland—including Hargeisa—boast safe, democratic, and culturally compelling destinations for tourists and professionals alike. Situated on a more temperate plateau, Hargeisa was a cultural epicentre for Somalis until the 1970s, and an overdue revival of its historical and creative essence is being fuelled by the tens of thousands of Somalis returning from the diaspora to their homeland with ideas and capital to invest.

How Maputo is driving new forms of collaboration between citizens and city governments

Eva Clemente's picture
The true test is whether open data leads to improvements in public services.


Maputo, Mozambique’s capital, celebrated its 130th anniversary in November. But that’s not its only milestone: This year, it became only the second city in sub-Saharan Africa to have its own open data platform—one of many exciting results to come out of its Open Data Roadmap.

#Blog4Dev: A Tech Hub in Mogadishu Aspires to Link Investors and Innovators

Awil Osman's picture



Joblessness among young Somali adults is a chronic issue confronting Somalia. Their unemployment rate is at staggering 67%. And the issue of youth joblessness is exacerbated by the large number of Somali students who graduate—from secondary schools and from tertiary organizations—with skills that are neither appropriate for Somalia nor competitive elsewhere.
 
Nonetheless, this aside, after almost three decades of turmoil—and of protracted conflict, terrorism, and piracy—Somalia is making huge entrepreneurial, socioeconomic, and political strides. This progress is encapsulated in a famous hashtag, popularized in 2017 and known as “#SomaliaRising.” In keeping with the spirit and momentum of this, we turned “Rising” into “iRise”—to demonstrate both how Somalis can improve  narrative, and bring our innovative and entrepreneurship ingenuity into play.
 
Our brand name is a catalyst for this hashtag and aims to popularize the movement.

In Somalia, communicating about reforms is just as important as implementing them

Hassan Hirsi's picture
Somalia’s government can generate revenue for public services if regulations and reforms are put in place. Photo: Hassan Hirsi/World Bank


Reform communications explains and promotes reforms to all concerned audiences, and ensures consistency, balance, and participation, all the way from a reform’s design to its implementation. It can also make sure that audiences understand the reform, contribute to stakeholder inclusion, and hold the owners of the reform accountable.
 
What does that mean in a country like Somalia? More importantly, what does that mean for a country like Somalia right now?

Project monitoring in fragile places does not have to be expensive

Andre Marie Taptue's picture
Also available in: Français



Conflict and violence are shrinking the space for development at a time when donors are scaling up their presence. To reconcile the conflicting objectives of staff safety with a need to do more (or a greater volume of investment), and doing it better (through higher quality projects), many development workers have started to rely on third party monitoring by outside agents, an approach that is costly and not always effective.
The case of Mali demonstrates that alternatives exist.

Less than a decade ago Bank staff could travel freely around in Mali, even to the most remote communities in the country. But today, a mix of terrorism and armed violence renders field supervision of projects impossible in many locations.

To address this challenge—and in the wake of the 2013/14 security crisis in northern Mali—a monitoring system was designed that is light, low cost, and suited for monitoring in insecure areas, but also problem oriented and able to facilitate improvements in project implementation.

Let’s harness the data revolution to promote agriculture and create jobs

Aidan Constantine Nzumi's picture



Agriculture is the backbone of many African economies, employing the most citizens in most countries, citizens who produce food for consumption and raw materials for industries. With the current data revolution, and the explosion of new data sources available in Tanzania, we can push for the integrated use of mechanization, fertilizers, and digital technologies to get more efficiency and productivity in our agriculture.

A game changer—the prospects and pitfalls of mobile money in Somalia

Rachel Firestone's picture

Mobile payments herald financial opportunity in Somalia. But for whom? And for how long? If Somalia’s telecommunications sector is the locomotive driving the economy, mobile money is the highway, transferring value and extending access to the economic playing field, nowadays at a rapid pace. 

In Côte d’Ivoire, every story counts: New computerized personnel and wage management system has improved employee satisfaction and effectiveness in the civil service

Taleb Ould Sid’Ahmed's picture
Also available in: Français
New computerized personnel and wage management system has improved employee satisfaction and effectiveness in the civil service



The story of a country’s economic development is often told through the lens of new roads, factories, power lines, and ports. However, it can also be told through the voices of everyday heroes, individuals who have taken action to improve their lives, and those around them. In this blog series, the World Bank Group, in partnership with the Ivorian newspaper Fraternité Matin and blogger Edith Brou, tells the stories of those individuals who, with a boost from a Bank project, have set economic development in motion in their communities.

Jacques Dongo, Inspector of Guidance Services in the Ministry of National Education and Vocational Training, proudly exhibits his loan certificate, the key to making some of his dreams come true. As we chatted with him in front of a counter in the Ministry of the Civil Service and Modernization of the Administration, he acknowledged the benefits of the new integrated civil service personnel management system (SIGFAE): “Before this system was set up, it was a game of cat and mouse between the ‘margouillats,’ or notorious intermediaries, and government departments to obtain documents. The introduction of the new system has completely changed this. It has taken me just 3 days to obtain this document once I fulfilled all the requirements.”

Are tablets the best way to increase digital literacy in African countries?

Edward Amartey-Tagoe's picture
Credit: Arne Hoel


A good number of African governments have shown how technologically-forward thinking they are by announcing one-tablet-per-child initiatives in their countries. President John recently announced that tablets for Ghana’s schoolchildren were at the center of his campaign to improve academic standards. Last year, President Kenyatta of Kenya abandoned a laptop project for tablets.

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