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June 2016

65 million people displaced by conflict – a challenge for development actors

Xavier Devictor's picture
The World Bank at World Water Week 2016

Starting this weekend, Stockholm will host the largest annual congregation of water aficionados, during World Water Week 2016.  It is an opportune moment to reflect on what social inclusion means for water, and on three stylized myths in the “mainstream” discourse, although there are also influential social movements that present alternative views.

Myth 1
Inclusion in water is about poverty or being “pro-poor”? Social inclusion may be about the poor but it needn’t necessarily be so.  

Campaign Art: Salvaging cars and saving lives

Davinia Levy's picture

People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

We all know that organ donations save lives. Some people have to wait months and years to receive the organ they need to stay alive. Sadly, some die before a compatible organ is found for them. According to the US Government, 22 people die each day waiting for an organ in that country alone. Globally, there are some countries that are very generous when it comes to organ donation. Argentina is not one of them.

A metaphor to view this issue is to compare the human body to car parts. If you think about it, in a way we all have a chassis (our skin, muscles and bones), a motor (our heart), we stay well-greased with oil (our blood), and our exhaust pipe is… well you can guess.

To incentivize organ donations in Argentina, a taxi company has been using donated car parts from a scrapyard to fix taxis in their fleet. In exchange, the taxis become visible awareness campaigns for the cause of organ donations.

CUCAIBA: Donor cars

Source: Ad Agency J. Walter Thompson Buenos Aires

Population estimates for certain countries with resident refugees

World Bank Data Team's picture

From July 2016, an adjustment will be made to the population estimates published in World Development Indicators of five countries affected by the refugee situation in the Middle East and North Africa region: Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, and Turkey. Previously, for these countries for 2011 onwards, refugees have been included in the population estimates of the country of origin. Going forward, population estimates will include refugees in the country in which they currently reside (also referred to as their country of asylum), rather than their country of origin. This means that Syrian refugees residing outside of Syria will no longer be counted in the Syrian population estimate.

This change improves the consistency between the population estimates of these countries and those   of countries in other regions, where estimates are based on a "de facto" definition – counting all residents, regardless of their legal status or citizenship. While population estimates are used for a wide variety of purposes, the change also improves the consistency between them and their use in estimating per capita incomes; the System of National Accounts does not distinguish between refugees and other groups of people for the purpose of determining residence, and this is the prevailing practice adopted by national statistical agencies.

The source of population estimates used for most low and middle-income countries, including these five countries, is the biennial United Nations Population Division's World Population Prospects. This uses a de facto definition of population, with refugees counted in their country of residence or asylum.

Indicators referenced in this posting:

 

Zambia can beat the economic slowdown by making every kwacha count

Gregory Smith's picture


Born in Tunisia, Selma Turki left her native country for France when she was two. She returned to Tunisia for high school and to pass her Baccalaureate. She studied architecture for two years at the Paris Ecole des Beaux Arts before moving to Canada to pursue her studies in computer science. She also accomplished leadership and management education at Henley Business School (UK) and Berkeley (US).

Disrupting health, driving disease transmission and worsening non-communicable diseases: we can act now to curb the impact of climate change on people’s health

Keith Hansen's picture
Africa’s cities have grown at an average rate of 4% per year over the past 20 years. While rapid urbanization has helped reduce poverty and improve livelihoods in the region, it is putting increasing pressure on Africa’s natural environment and sustainable development.
 
[Download a newly launched report—Greening Africa’s Cities—to learn more about the interplay between urbanization and sustainability in Africa.]
 
Take Kampala, Uganda as an example. It is estimated that only 5% of the city’s population is connected to the sewer network, with 95% of the population having access to basic on-site, mostly shared, sanitation. As a result, the volumes of flows entering the city’s Nakivubo wetland channels have increased significantly with contaminated runoff from informal areas and partially treated wastewater from the overburdened sewage works. This has significant negative impacts on human health, wetland and lake ecological function, as well as the cost of water supply to the city from Lake Victoria’s Inner Murchison Bay.
 
The city is considering rehabilitating the Nakivubo wetland, but it would cost US$53 million upfront, in addition to ongoing maintenance and operating costs of about US$3.6 million per year. Although benefits would include water treatment cost savings of US$1 million and recreational benefits exceeding US$22 million per year, it is now too costly and impractical to restore the wetland to a state where benefits can be achieved.

Do social factors determine “who we are” as well as the choice sets we have?

Karla Hoff's picture

Read this post in Español, Français, 中文

Photo: © Michael Morris / World Bank

When the World Bank’s Food Price Watch reported last week that severe drought pushed prices of staples such as maize and soybean to an all-time high this summer, people everywhere took notice. What will it mean for the poor in regions most affected by rising prices? What will it mean for us? 

Economist José Cuesta, who authors the Bank’s quarterly Food Price Watch, asked readers of our last blog entry to submit their own questions about food prices. Here are his answers to a few of them.

Pathways to Prosperity: An e-Symposium

Hanan Jacoby's picture

 

Blog #8: In building and agri boom, rural wage lift

India is home to the largest number of poor people in the world, as well as the largest number of people who have recently escaped poverty. Over the next few weeks, this blog series will highlight recent research from the World Bank and its partners on what has driven poverty reduction, what still stands in the way of progress, and the road to a more prosperous India.

We hope this will spark a conversation around #WhatWillItTake to #EndPoverty in India. Read all the blogs in this series, we look forward to your comments. 

Real wages have risen across India in the past two decades, but the increase was especially marked among rural unskilled workers. Three drivers – falling rural female labor force participation, a construction boom, and favorable agricultural terms of trade -- help explain why unskilled rural workers fared better than their urban counterparts or workers with more education. Going forward, in light of lower agricultural prices and slower growth in the construction sector, some of the factors that contributed to the increase in relative wages for unskilled labor during this period may not be sustained over time. 

The things we do: How we might address political polarization by looking inward

Roxanne Bauer's picture

If there’s one common theme that resonates across Western democracies this past year, it’s a rejection of the status quo. Some outsider politicians have ridden this wave of populism to political office or to strong second-place finishes, stretching the boundaries of political expression. Frustration, anger with the status quo, globalization and the tradeoffs that come with it, and inequality are all basic concerns of the voters catapulting these politicians to power.

Globally, it also seems that fault lines have been erected between cultures, religions, genders, and so on.

Regardless of where the frustration comes from, though, polarization along ideological lines and negative rhetoric are pervasive. While polarization is a complex issue (and not something we can explain in its entirety in a blog post), how people process information is a significant factor.
 
If people are not open to other viewpoints or do not think critically about the negative rhetoric they encounter— which often involves self-reflection— then how can change really be achieved?  How can the frustration fueling the polarization be addressed if we cannot compromise?

Dealing with de-risking: a tale of tenacity and creativity

Emile van der Does de Willebois's picture

In 2014, money transfer operators sending funds to Somalia were coming under increasing pressure. Western financial institutions, concerned about money possibly ending up in the hands of terrorists or persons on sanctions lists, decided the risk was too high and started pulling out. Although one channel remained open, the situation was so acute that the World Bank and the Somalia Multi-Partner Fund decided to take action and create a fallback position in case that last channel, too, should close. A scenario in which the Somali diaspora had no legitimate way to send money home to their families would have been devastating to Somalis who depend on these funds for their basic needs.
 

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