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June 2016

Can social protection play a role in reducing childhood violence?

Matthew H. Morton's picture
Photo: Scott Wallace / World Bank

As many as one billion children under the age of 18 experience some form of violence every year. This exposure is not only a violation of child rights; it can also hamper children’s cognitive development, mental health, educational achievement, and long-term labor market prospects.

Meanwhile, an estimated 1.9 billion people in 136 countries benefit from some type of social safety net, such as cash transfers and public works that target the poor and vulnerable—presenting a vast policy instrument with potential to help prevent childhood violence.

Conflict of interest: Digital privacy vs. national security

Roxanne Bauer's picture
It’s a dilemma only known in contemporary times: how to balance security and privacy.

Today, the internet is increasingly accessed through mobile devices, people are sharing more across multiple outlets, and bulk collection of data is growing. Private, personal information—Google searches, page clicks, GPS locations, and credit card swipes are all collected constantly and invisibly, often without the consumer's permission. Not only are businesses engaging in this tracking, but governments are also conducting surveillance on the basis of national security concerns. 

Governments have defended their actions by claiming that the information gathered helps fight threats to national security, both foreign and homegrown. People understand that governments need to give due weight to both privacy and national security; unfortunately, many do not receive even the most basic information regarding their country’s surveillance programs or whether their privacy is being violated.

According to Claire Connelly, “people’s right to privacy is being reduced by the day on the grounds of national security. And while it’s important to keep people safe from terror and other forms of national security threats, it’s arguable whether this should come at the cost of privacy."
 
Conflict of interest: Digital privacy vs. national security

Digital Development into Practice: Co-Designing a Citizen Feedback Tool that Makes Sense

Samhir Vasdev's picture
In the 1960s, Singapore was struggling with limited resources, a small domestic market, and high unemployment. Living standards were low, with most residents living in crowded, unsanitary slums.
 
Today's picture couldn't be any more different: in the span of just a few decades, the city-state has completely reinvented itself to become a model of urban innovation, consistently topping international rankings for livability and competitiveness.
 
But Singapore's transformation was no happy accident. This success story is the result of an innovative and carefully executed vision that looks at all aspects of urban development in a cohesive way. Singaporean leaders and urban planners have integrated land use, housing, transport, and natural resources management into one coherent, long-term strategy so they can work in sync and reinforce each other.
 
In this video, Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez and Abhas Jha take a closer look at the city's urban development approach, and describe how other countries can draw on Singapore's experience to build sustainable, livable cities.

Informed trading in business groups, ownership concentration, and market liquidity

Alvaro Enrique Pedraza Morales's picture
Also available in: Español | 日本語 
Picture of the Competitive Cities Technical Deep Dive participants enjoying a walk through the Minato Mirai 21 area (with the Cosmo Clock in the background), which aims to concentrate high-value added activities and a high quality of life in an integrated urban core in downtown Yokohama. Photo Credit: TDLC
The task of mayors and city leaders is no longer limited to providing efficient urban services to their citizens. Job creation is at the forefront of the economic development challenge globally.

Cities need jobs and opportunities for their citizens and the means to generate tax revenues to fund projects that meet their populations’ growing demand for basic services. The WBG flagship report on Competitive Cities outlines how creating jobs in urban areas – urgently but also at scale– is essential.
 
In November, 2017, we spent a week with approximately 30 city and national government officials and policymakers from several countries, including Argentina, Chile, Croatia, Egypt, Ethiopia, Malaysia, Philippines, Romania, South Africa, Tunisia and Uganda. These leaders represented diverse cities across the world, all with a common objective – how to make their cities and regions more competitive?

Many were dealing with a fragmented institutional landscape, often with overlapping jurisdictions – necessitating clarity of institutional circuits and processes. Some struggled to coordinate economic development strategies with private sector. Lack of adequate sub-national socio-economic data to drive evidence-based policy making compounded issues. City leaders are not looking for a lesson in theory – but evidence of what works and what doesn’t, and practical, implementable examples of how to get things done.
 
We spent the week as part of a Technical Deep Dive, studying and living the experience of two exceptional Japanese cities - Yokohama and Kobe. These cities have dealt with:
  • population influx,
  • industrialized at a rapid pace,
  • responded to environmental challenges,
  • reached the technological frontier,
  • undergone a housing bubble,
  • and even went through a major disaster (the Kobe earthquake) and recovered from it.

Pathways to Prosperity: An e-Symposium

Yue Li's picture
Pathways to Prosperity Banner


Blog #9: Where you live decides how ‘well’ you live

India is home to the largest number of poor people in the world, as well as the largest number of people who have recently escaped poverty. Over the next few weeks, this blog series will highlight recent research from the World Bank and its partners on what has driven poverty reduction, what still stands in the way of progress, and the road to a more prosperous India.

We hope this will spark a conversation around 
#WhatWillItTake to #EndPoverty in India. Read all the blogs in this series, we look forward to your comments. 

Location and poverty are intimately linked. In India’s rapidly transforming economy, where the boundaries between rural and urban have become increasingly blurred, living standards are much higher in ‘good’ locations, and much worse in places that are not so ‘good’. In the years to come, creating more such ‘good’ locations, and spreading their prosperity to surroundings areas, will play a key role in raising incomes and reducing poverty in India.

From Evidence to Impact: reaching Indonesia’s poorest through better targeting

Maura Leary's picture
Jacqueline Mavinga, entrepreneur, Democratic Republic of Congo.  © John McNally/World Bank Group


从孩提起,Gircilene Gilca de Castro就梦想拥有一家自己的企业,并为创办该企业付出了艰苦努力。此后,她在巴西创办了一家食品服务公司。起初,该公司只有两名雇员和一名顾客。此时,她认识到,自己需要更多地了解如何推动企业成长。为此,她找到了合适的教育和培训指导机会,也掌握了新的企业管理方法。

PabsyLive: Cass Sunstein on “The World According to Star Wars”

Etta Cala Klosi's picture

The Force for Good is Strong in International Development

When she was a little girl in the Philippines, World Bank communications officer Pabsy Pabalan was barred by her brother from touching his impressive collection of Star Wars toys. But with the stealth of a Jedi warrior, she once managed to spirit away the Millennium Falcon for an epic adventure.

Unlocking the transformative power of waterways

Karla Gonzalez Carvajal's picture
Last month, the World Trade Organization held its annual Public Forum, with over 2,000 participants joining discussions on how to make trade more inclusive.

Why collaboration is fundamental to solve very complex problems with Alison Gold

Enrique Rubio's picture

Alison Gold is a cross-sector changemaker. She brings together people from different industries, areas of expertise and knowledge because collaboration is fundamental to solve complex problems. Alison says that on tackling complex problems (also known in design thinking jargon as “wicked problems”) there are many things that need to be tried to understand the type of solution that can make a change, and that truly matters.

Alison tells us how one of her mentors once told her that “you have to start somewhere, and follow it everywhere” as a way to understand that problems are interconnected with many variables, and others problems. She says that it is fundamental to incorporate people with diverse perspectives in order to understand all of those connections, rather than seeing only one cause or perspective.

Collaboration is critical to successfully implement change and solutions, and Alison says that this type of high level collaboration is not only between the experts in certain areas, but also includes those who are actually living within the conditions created by those problems. Alison thinks that just building such a strong team is profound in itself. That is why building relationships is one of the fundamental steps in solving complex problems.
 

EP017: Why Collaboration is Fundamental to Solve Very Complex Problems with Alison Gold

 


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